Namibia: Fisheries Underspends By N$6,7m

Posted By Stop Illegal Fishing:12th Jul, 2018: Fisheries Management · Governance

The fisheries ministry underspent by N$ 6,7 million for the financial year ended March 2017, an audit report by auditor general Junias Kandjeke indicates.

Tabled in the National Assembly by finance deputy minister Natangwe Ithete recently, the report revealed that the underspending was due to that ministry cutting on some services and costs.

These include the cancelling a number of overseas and local trips by the offices of the minister and his deputy, reducing sea voyages, beach and river patrols, as well as maintenance work on research vessels.

According to the report, the cancellation of the N$1,1 million construction project of the ministry’s office for the Kavango regions also contributed to the underexpenditure.

“The construction of the ministry’s regional office did not progress as planned as the contractor who was awarded the contract could not fulfil its obligations,” Kandjeke disclosed.

He thus urged the ministry to put measures in place to avoid underexpenditure, to ensure that planned projects are implemented, and that they comply with treasury instructions.

Documentary reviews by the auditor also revealed that the ministry has eight stock control points, but stocktaking was only conducted at five of these points.

“No treasury approval was obtained not to carry out stock-taking at the other three points,” he noted.

The ministry stated in the report that due to budget cuts, they were unable to obtain treasury approval for not conducting stocktaking at the other points.

Kandjeke also established that the ministry only managed to collect N$108 million in fishing quota levies as opposed to the estimated N$122 million.

He said the undercollection was caused by a number of factors. One was the overlapping of the financial year versus fishing seasons, and fees payable by rock lobster fisheries taking into account the rebate margins, which implies that no quota fees are payable for the first four tonnes.

The report furthermore showed that the ministry provided study assistance to 12 staff members amounting to N$380 000.

SOURCE: All Africa

Recent Posts

Seychelles: Fish Exports Rise in Seychelles, Giving Boost to Economy

Exports of fresh and frozen fish are up in the first six months...

Read More...

Gambia: EU signs Sustainable Fishing Partnership Agreement with The Republic of The Gambia

Last Friday, the EU and The Republic of The Gambia signed a new...

Read More...

The Serious Impacts of Fisheries Crime

The following are Channing Mavrellis’ remarks from the Impacts panel at the 2018...

Read More...

Mozambique shaken after string of mysterious murders, crime spree

Since October 2017, the country’s Cabo Delgado province has been plagued by a...

Read More...

SIF News Categories

The Issues

One in four fish in Africa is caught illegally, this threatens the sustainability of fish stocks, damages the ecosystem and deprives governments of income and people of livelihoods.

Find Out More...

Our Approach

Creating change by informing policy and practice, our hands on experience and investigative work means we are often the first to spot new trends and find ways to challenge these.

Read More...

Our Initiatives

Illegal fishing is a complex issue that requires multifaceted responses. Stop Illegal Fishing are working with a range of organisations to bring about change.

Find Out More...

Recent Posts

Seychelles: Fish Exports Rise in Seychelles, Giving Boost to Economy

Exports of fresh and frozen fish are up in the first six months...

Read More...

Gambia: EU signs Sustainable Fishing Partnership Agreement with The Republic of The Gambia

Last Friday, the EU and The Republic of The Gambia signed a new...

Read More...

The Serious Impacts of Fisheries Crime

The following are Channing Mavrellis’ remarks from the Impacts panel at the 2018...

Read More...